Category: Coaching and MCH

UIC Students Attend 2017 Making Lifelong Connections Annual Meeting

UIC students Müge Chavdar, Erin Howes, Paula Satariano, Janine Salameh, and Izumi Chihara (left to right) attend the 2017 MLC Annual Meeting in Seattle, Washington.

By: Erin Howes, MPH Candidate in Community Health Sciences and Maternal and Child Health

This April I had the incredible opportunity, thanks to the UIC- Center of Excellence of Maternal and Child Health, to experience two firsts: visit Seattle and attend an academic conference! The 2017 Making Lifelong Connections (MLC), held in Seattle, Washington on April 5th-7th, 2017, hosted current and former trainees from the various Maternal and Child Health (MCH) training programs. MLC provided a platform for personal and professional networking and to share ideas on how to advocate for MCH populations.

The conference kicked off with any student’s dream – drinks, appetizers, and poster presentations. Listening to other student poster presentations was an informative experience where I learned so much and felt inspired for my own capstone project, which I will conduct next year.  One of my favorite presentations was from a social worker in Seattle focusing on refugee health. This presentation drew my attention because of my interests in public health. I currently work at an FQHC in Chicago, Esperanza Health Center, which is located the community of Little Village. This community is predominantly immigrant and most residents are of Mexican decent. I was interested to see how the health status of immigrant communities in Seattle differ from those in Chicago. I learned about the healthcare system in Washington, the different populations they serve, and  how the differences in healthcare policy affect women, children and families.  It’s amazing how different maternal and child health issues can look from state to state and I never would have learned about Washington’s needs without meeting these fellow trainees.

Attending the MLC also gave me a deeper appreciation for the families that are impacted by MCH programs and services. During another portion of the meeting, I had the opportunity to meet a mother who has children with a special healthcare need. This woman collaborates with the LEND (Leadership Education in Nerodevelopmental and Related Disabilities) Program. She shared her story and informed us that she is a foster parent to 7 children and that 4  of these children have disabilities. Beyond being a foster parent, she is also a community health worker and a researcher.  She used her experiences to inform her research and to understand the caregiver experience. She also examined the needs of children and youth with special healthcare needs as they transition to adulthood and their higher risk of homelessness. I appreciated the opportunity to hear this narrative because it provided me the context to appreciate the importance of  programs that serve families who have children with special healthcare needs and how multiple systems should come together to protect vulnerable population.

Because this conference places a strong focus on building connections, many of the events allowed for interaction and reflection. A key activity that continued throughout the conference was the “Ring of Connections” in which every participant was provided with their own personal business cards to trade with new connections throughout the conference. This served as an icebreaker and allowed people to get to know each other, while also having the contact information to maintain communication following the conference. We also did some speed-networking, which allowing us to meet dozens of trainees in minutes.

Finally, the conference provided three wonderful, thought-provoking keynote speeches from booming professionals in the MCH field. One speech made a profound impact on me was given by Lauren Raskin Ramos, the director of the Division of MCH Workforce Development under HRSA. She spoke about her professional journey, taught us about the possibilities of our careers, and the power of making change by serving in government. One piece of her speech that stood out to me was her advice to seek people who see you as a leader. Sometimes we need to look for outside associations and organizations for leadership roles. Lauren encouraged us to pursue those skills and opportunities if they are not in front of you, and to be the kind of leader you would follow. I appreciated the reminder from Lauren who motivated me to re-evaluate my strategy to strengthen my leadership skills, and provided me an example of how to combine my passion for MCH with my goal to become a leader in public health.

I truly enjoyed this conference and I look forward to connecting with MCH leaders in the future!

To learn more about Making Lifeling Connections, click here.


CDC’s Millennial Health Summit to End Health Disparities

Kera (CoE in MCH Student) with others at the summitAs a public health nerd, who follows the Center for Disease Control and Prevention with as much love and fervor as National Football League fans, I was excited to notice a flyer posted on campus about a free conference at the CDC. The Millennial Health Leaders Summit is a two day intensive training for graduate and medical students to network, learn, and explore case studies about addressing health disparities. My heart dropped when I read that only two representatives would be chosen to attend. “What are the odds that a first year master’s student would be selected?” I thought disparagingly. The application was simple: in 300 words or less answer “What will be the most important public health issue confronting communities that experience health disparities in 2025? What will you be doing in 2025 to address and reduce these disparities?” I wrote my essay in a caffeinated stream of conscience. My deep-seated anger at the smear campaign on Planned Parenthood and the ongoing war in America to limit women’s access to reproductive healthcare finally had an outlet. The essay I constructed is without a doubt my personal manifesto.

One month later I forwarded an email with the subject line of “Congratulations on your acceptance to the Millennial Health Summit” to my adviser with my own addition on the top in all capitals that simply stated, “I GOT IT” followed with six exclamation marks.

I attended the Millennial Health Summit just three months later. I met several Maternal and Child Health majors from across the country. We compared classes, professors, and how our programs were set up. It was a fantastic networking opportunity with the students and presenters from around the country. I learned so much from this conference but here are my top three takeaways from the Summit:

  • Cross Collaboration is key. There was an urban planner who pointed out all of the ways that the poor planning of our cities creates obesity. One cannot fight obesity with just education. We have to work with urban planners, architects, and the department of transportation to create environmental change. He also pointed out if you can partner with the department of transportation to create more bike lanes or parks you have made your city healthier without even touching your public health budget!
  • Advocacy requires both qualitative and quantitative data. Paula “Tran” Inzeo from Family Living Programs, a health promotion specialist from Wisconsin conducted a breakout session, stating “you can have the data, but it is real people’s stories and voices that have the power to move mountains. The example was in their advocacy work to open alternative court systems in Wisconsin. They had all the facts and figures detailing how mass incarceration was a problem in Wisconsin; however, it was the voice of a veteran who had been helped directly by a substance abuse court that helped him get his life back on track with alternative sentencing of mandatory substance abuse treatment and community service rather than jail time.
  • I learned so much through the process of getting there. This is my biggest word of advice to master’s students- apply and try. Just try. I really did not think that I would be selected and even if I had not my 300 word essay is by far the piece of writing from my graduate career. I submitted it as my sample writing for several job applications that I was subsequently offered. More importantly it provided me with an opportunity to think beyond graduate school. It made me stop and think about what issue is most important to me, what aspect of that work do I want to be doing, and what position do I want to host in ten years. Once you think deeply about your priorities you can be selective with your time and energy. You can draft a plan of attack on how to get to your dream job. I highly recommend anyone of any profession to do this writing exercise for their professional development.

Written by Kera Beskin, MPH Candidate 2017 


MCH Leadership Competencies at UIC CoE in MCH

There are 13 Maternal & Child Health (MCH) Masters of Public Health (MPH) Training Programs supported by the MCH Bureau (MCHB) and funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). The goal of the training programs is to educate and prepare the next generation of MCH leaders to ensure the health of our nation’s families and children. Each training program utilizes different strategies to ensure the trainees are prepared, but a common requirement of all programs is education and training on the MCH Leadership Competencies.

The MCH Training Programs were developed in alignment with the strategic plan created by the MCHB to ensure that MCH leaders “have the vision, expertise, and skills to provide the leadership needed to design and implement policies and programs to assure that children grow into competent, independent, nurturing, and caring adults”. 1 The leadership competencies were born out of that as a way to measure whether or not trainees were in fact rising to become leaders in the field.

The competencies are outlined in three main areas: self, others, and wider community.1 Self includes increasing one’s learning through reading, self reflection, instruction, and other experiences.1 Others includes leadership amongst fellow classmates, coworkers, colleagues, and practitioners.1 Wider community is defined as organizations, systems, and institutions.1 Each of the 3 areas have specific competencies. There are 12 total competencies among the areas of self, others, and wider community.1 Some of the competencies include MCH knowledge base, ethics & professionalism, negotiation & conflict resolution, and policy & advocacy. 1 To measure progress, trainees take a competency self assessment before beginning the MPH program and once completed.

Here at UIC, one unique way we are working towards MCH leadership is by utilizing Clifton Strengths Finder, a product of the Gallup Organization. If you’re unfamiliar with Strengths Finder, it is an online survey that asks questions about an individual’s likes and dislikes and provides responses on a Likert-type Scale. Individuals complete the assessment and in the end are provided with their top five strengths out of a total thirty four possible strengths. The underlying assumption of Strengths Finder is that each person innately has a unique combination of strengths that they bring to any given situation. Strengths Finder helps to identify those strengths to allow the individual to build on them personally and professionally. Each person in our first year MCH cohort completed the assessment. We each were provided with an outline of what our individual strengths meant, how they would serve us well personally and professionally, as well as some tools for personal reflection. Additionally, we were provided with a chart that highlighted every student in the cohorts strengths along with a quick guide to what each strength meant. Conversations took place about what characteristics were unique to each strength as well as tips regarding how to best work together both in the classroom and in the workforce. Utilizing Strengths Quest, or any similar assessment, is an excellent exercise because it utilizes positive psychology to provide a safe space to have discussions about teamwork and leadership while also giving individuals a starting point for individual reflection. Additionally, it provided us with a better understanding of our peers and increased appreciation for the strengths of others. It was an excellent addition to our academic training in the competency areas of self and others.

To find out more about MCH Leadership 3.0 visit:

http://www.amchp.org/programsandtopics/WorkforceDevelopment/Pages/MCH-Leadership-Competencies.aspx

To learn more about Strengths Finder visit:

https://www.gallupstrengthscenter.com/?utm_source=homepage&utm_medium=webad&utm_campaign=strengthsdashboard

References:
1 MCH Leadership Competencies Workgroup. (2009). Maternal and child health leadership competencies version 3.0.

Written by Michelle Chavdar, Research Assistant and UIC MPH Candidate


Authentic Leadership: A Coach-Approach to Inspired Public Health Leadership (Should I Apply)?

Authentic Leadership may be for you if you say YES to any or all of the following:

  1. I work in some capacity to improve public health/maternal and child health.
  2. I want to forge my own path to leadership.
  3. I want a new role/responsibility/job/career in public health.
  4. I want to increase my level of satisfaction/engagement at work.
  5. I want to be in a program that invites me to co-design my learning and growth areas.
  6. I want to explore what makes me a leader.
  7. I want to self-identify as a leader.
  8. I want to feel alive, satisfied, and passion-filled about my professional and personal decisions.
  9. I want time and space to self-reflect.
  10. I appreciate (or want to appreciate) the value of self-awareness related to leadership.
  11. I have a leadership style that is different from everyone else’s style.
  12. Nobody understands me.
  13. I want to learn how to say yes to things that are most important to me and no to those things that are not currently a priority.
  14. I want someone else to help hold me accountable for what I say I want.
  15. I am tired of doing things in public health the same old way.
  16. I want to feel confident and secure in who I am.
  17. I want to focus on building my leadership strengths.
  18. I want a smooth transition into retirement.
  19. I want to shake things up in my life/work.
  20. I want to have greater impact in my work or life.
  21. I want more confidence.
  22. I want to feel the fire in my belly.
  23. I want to trust myself (more).
  24. I want my own certified professional coach.
  25. I want to have fun while I learn.
  26. I want to be in a program that doesn’t feel like more work added to my current, crazy workload.
  27. I am tired, burned out, overwhelmed.
  28. I am frustrated with the status quo.
  29. I can’t remember why I got into public health.
  30. I have a brilliant idea that I want to develop.
  31. I am innovative, passionate, creative and believe there are new ways to improve public health.
  1. I have been unsuccessfully looking outside myself for the answers to my questions.
  2. I want to create meaningful connections to others exploring leadership in the MCH field.

Authentic Leadership: A Coach-Approach to Inspired Public Health Leadership (Outcomes)

If you decide to enroll in Authentic Leadership, ou can expect to:

1)      Identify a set of authentic, individualized, values based personal/professional goals that support your leadership development and the impact you want to make in public health.

2)      Assess your current level of satisfaction with your personal and professional life.

3)      Improve your level of satisfaction in a minimum two life areas.

4)      Identify your leadership strengths and develop a plan to practice leading from strengths.

5)      Improve your emotionally intelligent leadership competencies related to the awareness and management of your emotions and those of others.

6)      Identify your personal and professional values through a values clarification process.

7)      Connect and develop lasting, creative, innovative, open relationships and community with diverse MCH colleagues from across the US.

8)      Develop a Leadership Philosophy and/or I Am A Leader Who…Statement/Youtube video that expresses your unique leadership philosophy.

9)      Create a Leadership Development Plan that you can sustain and that you feel personally accountable to over the 6-12 months following program conclusion.

10)  Identify yourself as an MCH leader regardless of your role and/position.

11)  Take on a new MCH role or position (if desired) or feel engaged and satisfied with your current work.

 

Above and beyond these outcomes, the experiences you take from this program will change you, or help you to become more of your true self, and you will remember and apply the learnings in new ways and for a long time.  Program participants who took our program as early as 2010 are still talking about how the program changed their lives.

 

 


Registration Open – July 2012 MCH Leadership and Legacy Retreat

July 22-24, 2012

Hyatt Lodge, Oak Brook, IL

 Leading in Challenging Times: Innovations & Inspiration

Please consider joining us this summer for the 5th annual UIC MCH Leadership, Legacy, and Community Retreat.  This year’s retreat is exciting! Our focus is on Leading in Challenging Times; however, we will not talk about this concept in ways that you may expect. We will begin with sharing personal stories of our journey and work with women, men, children, and families. Dr. Michael Fraser, CEO of the Association for Maternal and Child Health Programs (AMCHP) will lead us in this process. We will continue to connect with one another through a building common ground exercise followed by a thought-provoking discussion about what motivates us!

During the rest of the Retreat, we will explore and practice various leadership concepts including challenging the assumption that these are indeed challenging times. Change is ubiquitous. Everything is always changing and today these changes are happening at an increasingly rapid pace across all aspects of our lives: the economy, the environment, technology, public health, medicine, music, leadership, etc. As we continue to move forward in ever-changing times, what do we know and do in this day and age to support ourselves, each other, the environment, the economy, and the work to which we have devoted our lives?

We will explore a process that will turn our thoughts about leadership upside down. This will be followed with work about managing change as change is a primary leadership challenge we all face. Finally, we will conclude the program with work on the core act of leadership which involves changing the typical conversations in which we engage so that we can ultimately experience the positive outcomes for women, men, children, and families that we all desire!

The leadership training will be facilitated by Dr. Stephen Bogdewic, PhD, Executive Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs & Professional Development at the Indiana University School of Medicine. Many of us have had the honor of working with, learning from, and being inspired by Dr. Bogdewic. He is an innovative, thought leader. He is connected with the human spirit and our core desires to make an impact. He has taken what he teaches and implemented it in practice to help change the face of the Indiana University School of Medicine.  Click on the following link to view the agenda.

*Please note the event starts on Sunday

 

Registration

Professionals: $325 (early registration ends on 07/06/2012) or $425 (late registration)

Students: $150

Click on the following link to register.

 

For more information visit our website.



Coaching in the Federal government.

Hi All.

Here is a link to a nice article about the use of coaching in the federal government.


July 2011 Coaching and Leadership Development Program

Leadership Development and Coaching For MCH Professionals

A Program for Interdisciplinary, Intergenerational MCH Professionals

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The Maternal and Child Health Program (MCHP) at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) provides easily accessible, engaging, and efficient leadership development opportunities for MCH professionals.  In the broad field of MCH, there are many and varied opportunities to develop leadership capacity related to a specific skill-set and/or knowledge base; however, there are limited opportunities to engage in personal leadership development opportunities that support individuals in exploring their goals and vision for MCH, developing emotional intelligence, and exploring work/life balance and overall life satisfaction.  In response, the UIC MCHP offers a 6-month, distance-based professional leadership development and coaching program for MCH professionals across the United States.

The program includes monthly group leadership development phone calls and monthly, individual coaching sessions with a professional leadership coach.  All work takes place by phone. The target audience includes intergenerational, interdisciplinary MCH professionals who work in a Title V-funded program or an MCHB-funded training program (LEND, LEAH, PPC, SPH, Nutrition, etc.) and other professionals in the public and not-for-profit sectors who are committed to improving the health and wellbeing of women, children, and families.  Because learning is applied at the individual level, participants may include senior level leaders, mid-level managers, emerging leaders, and young professionals.  Interested individuals complete a short application and submit a 1-2 page Letter of Interest.  The program begins twice each year in January and July.  The application due date for the July 2011 program is Monday, May 16, 2011.

Participants in this program:

  • Identify leadership strengths and action steps to support the enhancement of these strengths.
  • Identify leadership gaps and steps to address noted gaps.
  • Develop a set of personal/professional values to guide decision-making.
  • Engage in self-reflection exercises to enhance personal leadership and explore opportunities to improve their skill set, work satisfaction, and level of work engagement.
  • Identify sources of personal reward and rejuvenation to sustain productivity and MCH commitment.
  • Explore their passion for MCH and engage in work that has the impact they desire.
  • Create a leadership development action plan to support their ongoing leadership development and commitment to the field of MCH.
  • Support your current life situation and not add additional work.

The program and professional coaching is delivered by UIC MCHP Continuing Education Director, Kris Risley, DrPH, CPCC and a group of certified professional coaches trained through the Coaches Training Institute (CTI).  The program cost is $1800/person.

If you are a senior level leader with a desire to take on different responsibilities or you would like to develop and carry out a new vision; you are a young professional or emerging leader exploring your career path; you are burned out in your existing work environment; you are ready to take your work to the next level; or you simply  have more to offer, please consider this program.

For additional information,  please contact Kris Risley via email/phone kyrisley@uic.edu/312-996-2875 or Jaime Klaus at jaimkl@uic.edu/312-996-0724 or visit our website.  If you would like to apply for the program, please complete the Application and return to Jaime Klaus.