Category: MCH Leadership Competencies 3.0: Other: Interdisciplinary Team Building

MCH Leadership Competencies at UIC CoE in MCH

There are 13 Maternal & Child Health (MCH) Masters of Public Health (MPH) Training Programs supported by the MCH Bureau (MCHB) and funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). The goal of the training programs is to educate and prepare the next generation of MCH leaders to ensure the health of our nation’s families and children. Each training program utilizes different strategies to ensure the trainees are prepared, but a common requirement of all programs is education and training on the MCH Leadership Competencies.

The MCH Training Programs were developed in alignment with the strategic plan created by the MCHB to ensure that MCH leaders “have the vision, expertise, and skills to provide the leadership needed to design and implement policies and programs to assure that children grow into competent, independent, nurturing, and caring adults”. 1 The leadership competencies were born out of that as a way to measure whether or not trainees were in fact rising to become leaders in the field.

The competencies are outlined in three main areas: self, others, and wider community.1 Self includes increasing one’s learning through reading, self reflection, instruction, and other experiences.1 Others includes leadership amongst fellow classmates, coworkers, colleagues, and practitioners.1 Wider community is defined as organizations, systems, and institutions.1 Each of the 3 areas have specific competencies. There are 12 total competencies among the areas of self, others, and wider community.1 Some of the competencies include MCH knowledge base, ethics & professionalism, negotiation & conflict resolution, and policy & advocacy. 1 To measure progress, trainees take a competency self assessment before beginning the MPH program and once completed.

Here at UIC, one unique way we are working towards MCH leadership is by utilizing Clifton Strengths Finder, a product of the Gallup Organization. If you’re unfamiliar with Strengths Finder, it is an online survey that asks questions about an individual’s likes and dislikes and provides responses on a Likert-type Scale. Individuals complete the assessment and in the end are provided with their top five strengths out of a total thirty four possible strengths. The underlying assumption of Strengths Finder is that each person innately has a unique combination of strengths that they bring to any given situation. Strengths Finder helps to identify those strengths to allow the individual to build on them personally and professionally. Each person in our first year MCH cohort completed the assessment. We each were provided with an outline of what our individual strengths meant, how they would serve us well personally and professionally, as well as some tools for personal reflection. Additionally, we were provided with a chart that highlighted every student in the cohorts strengths along with a quick guide to what each strength meant. Conversations took place about what characteristics were unique to each strength as well as tips regarding how to best work together both in the classroom and in the workforce. Utilizing Strengths Quest, or any similar assessment, is an excellent exercise because it utilizes positive psychology to provide a safe space to have discussions about teamwork and leadership while also giving individuals a starting point for individual reflection. Additionally, it provided us with a better understanding of our peers and increased appreciation for the strengths of others. It was an excellent addition to our academic training in the competency areas of self and others.

To find out more about MCH Leadership 3.0 visit:

http://www.amchp.org/programsandtopics/WorkforceDevelopment/Pages/MCH-Leadership-Competencies.aspx

To learn more about Strengths Finder visit:

https://www.gallupstrengthscenter.com/?utm_source=homepage&utm_medium=webad&utm_campaign=strengthsdashboard

References:
1 MCH Leadership Competencies Workgroup. (2009). Maternal and child health leadership competencies version 3.0.

Written by Michelle Chavdar, Research Assistant and UIC MPH Candidate


MCH Student Practicum Experiences 2015

We were able to connect with two Center of Excellence (CoE) in Maternal in Child Health (MCH) Masters students who completed their field practicums over the summer. We asked them to share their experiences and tell us what coursework helped them prepare for the programs.  Read their stories below.

Student internship program. Picture of the student and her preceptorMCH Epidemiology (EPI) Student Participates in Graduate Student EPI Program (GSEP) in Oregon

I had the privilege of participating in the Graduate Student Epidemiology Program (GSEP) at the Health Authority in Portland, Oregon. The GSEP internship is managed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) and allows students to partake in MCH Epidemiology projects in state, local or tribal government settings. This summer, I worked on two projects that allowed me to use my classroom knowledge in a real world setting.

My first project focused on an analysis of Oregon youth participating in the “Choking Game,” a strangulation activity in which adolescents cut off oxygen to the brain in order to achieve temporary euphoria. Oregon is the only state conducting statewide surveillance on Choking Game participation, and our research is the first to focus on children at highest risk of injury or death – youth who participate alone. My work consisted of a literature review, statistical analysis using STATA, and draft manuscript to be considered for publication in a national journal. I will also be presenting our findings at the 2015 APHA Annual Meeting.

My second project, a cost-benefit analysis of flu vaccines administered through School Based Health Centers (SBHC), pushed me to use my analytical skills in a new realm – business and finance. My analysis demonstrated the cost-effectiveness of SBHCs across Oregon and the financial formula spreadsheets I produced can be leveraged by other states to illustrate the importance of their own SBHCs.

Over the summer, it became evident that my UIC training had prepared me to tackle these projects in an efficient and capable manner. My epidemiology, biostatistics, and MCH courses provided not only the skills necessary to complete assigned tasks, but the knowledge to apply my skills to real-world research questions. In addition, I came away with the following lessons learned:

  1. Focus on the details, but never lose site of the big picture. Learning to review the data and understand how it made sense in the big picture helped me conceptualize my findings and bridge the gap between research and broader health policy.
  2. Collaboration is key. While the majority of my work was completed with my preceptor, it was necessary to seek additional insight and feedback from other subject matter experts. Effective communication and collaboration skills are essential for future public health professionals, and I saw firsthand the value of strong working relationships.
  3. Don’t be afraid to be wrong. At the beginning, I was often nervous that my approach was flawed and found myself wishing for a non-existent answer key. With the support of my mentor, I became more comfortable taking leaps, making guesses and learning to make mistakes, which helped me grow and become more confident in my abilities.

By Alexandra Ibrahim, CoE in MCH EPI student

 

Cindy San Miguel, CoE student with leadership award MCH Student Participates in MCH Paired Practica Program in Michigan

I completed the National MCH Workforce Development Center’s Paired Practica at the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services in the Children’s Special Health Care Services (CSHCS) division. The practicum focuses on developing the next generation of MCH professionals by pairing a graduate student from a Maternal Child Health Program with an undergraduate student from Howard University.

My mentee and I worked on a project for the CSHCS’s Family Center, a parent-driven unit providing emotional support and resources to families of children and youth with special health care needs. Acknowledging that technological advances have created new opportunities for communication, our project focused on:

  • How the division communicates with families today,
  • What families feel about the current communication, and
  • What families want to see in the future.

We designed the entire analysis, from conducting a literature review, to gathering data and reporting final results. Twenty-eight families were recruited and administered a mixed methods survey (multiple choice and open-ended questions). We also created a database documenting the social media presence of the 45 Local Health Departments. Our findings were then presented to division leader, who are now working to implement our recommendations. I was surprised at how much I relied on my coursework throughout the summer. I had not worked with this population before, so I returned to lectures from my MCH courses to better understand the issues facing parents of children with special healthcare needs. The spring MCH Systems course (CHSC 511) was particularly helpful in preparing for the practicum. One of my other projects was to track the monthly budget for an epilepsy grant, and I used my budgeting slides from the spring Integrated Core course.

While it is difficult to narrow down, the top three things I learned this summer were:

  1. Mentorship is incredibly important. My practicum reminded me of the value of having a good support system. A lot of us will end up in leadership positions, and the experience of mentoring another student helped me prepare for future leadership roles.
  2. Care coordination is essential. We acknowledge care coordination as an issue in our courses, but working with families who have children with really complicated medical issues, allowed me to understand the burden families face when coordinating the multitude of services for their children.
  3. Remember to humanize our communities. Each individual makes up the community, and individual stories are indicative of what is happening at the broader population level. It was heartbreaking to see families’ day-to-day struggles, but also encouraging to know that when we do good public health work, we can improve families’ everyday lives.

By Cindy San Miguel, CoE in MCH student


Practicum Experience 2014: Chicago Department of Public Health

IMG_7584 (4)So far, our time at the Women and Children’s Health Division at the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) has been very translational to what we learned in our first year at the University of Illinois at Chicago, School of Public Health (UIC SPH).  We are conducting a Community Health Needs Assessment for the MCH population in Chicago under the guidance of CDPH Assistant Commissioner, Susan Hossli. To start, we gathered quantitative data in the form of vital statistics; this included infant mortality rates, low birth weight percentages, preterm deliveries, and teenage pregnancy rates for Chicago and the 77 community areas. We used the data to identify 18 community areas that have the poorest outcomes and we designated them as “Hot Spots.” These community areas are located on both the South and West Sides of Chicago.

After we compiled quantitative data for Chicago and the Hot Spots, we created a demographic picture of each neighborhood, which included socioeconomic status, overall health, education attainment, insurance, income, housing, poverty, crime, food access, and educational resources. These topics touched on what we learned in the Determinants of Population Health class, a new introductory class in the pilot core (IPHS 494). We learned that health is not only affected by biological factors, but also where you live, learn, play, work, pray, and age. It is also pivotal to understand that factors affecting health run the entire life course, as well as transcend generations.

Following the quantitative data, we prepared a systems analysis for each community area. The systems assessment analyzes the available resources in one’s neighborhood; this includes, but is not limited to Healthy Start programs, FQHCs, Healthy Families, Better Birth Outcomes, family case management, hospitals, clinics, birthing hospitals, WIC, family planning, behavioral health programs, and dental programs. This process was very informative because we gained a holistic view of the healthcare environment in the Hot Spot community areas.

We took Community Health Assessment (CHSC 431) in Spring 2014, and it was the perfect primer for this practicum. The knowledge, skills and tools we gained in that class proved essential for our success in this practicum. In CHSC 431, we learned the basics of a community health assessment: what it is, how the process works, where to find the appropriate and credible data, how to identify priority issues, how to obtain and analyze qualitative data, and then how to disseminate the information to community groups and key stakeholders. Another useful class prior to this practicum was MCH Delivery Systems: Services, Programs, and Policies (CHSC 511). In this course, we were introduced to the concept of what a health care delivery system is. We learned about the service delivery system for women, infants, children, and children with special health care needs. Our cumulative project over the semester was to synthesize and analyze the MCH delivery system for various states.

For a holistic view on the health status of Women and Children in Chicago, it is necessary to have a mixed-methods approach for data acquisition. Quantitative data is important to provide a snapshot of the health status, but qualitative data provides a full narrative of the gaps in access to a healthy life. We are currently scheduling focus groups on the West and South Sides of Chicago with consumers, service providers, and community based organizations. The focus groups will complete the needs assessment, and then a Strategic Plan for the City of Chicago will be formulated based on the data and gaps in services found in the needs assessment.

This practicum has been a learning opportunity since we have seen our coursework play out in a practical setting. It is exciting to see our work with the needs assessment play such a large role for the Department of Public Health. This project was undertaken with the hopes of influencing future programming and decision making within the city for healthy mothers and babies.

By Joanna Tess and Dan Weiss, UIC MCHP Students

 


Want to Know More About MCH?

The students in the University of Washington Maternal and Child Health
(MCH) Program and in other MCH schools of public health training
programs nationwide created a visual narrative of the public health work
and research they are doing in their communities. The presentation was done with the help of Charlotte Noble and the University of South Florida MCH Program.

You can view the presentation here.  If you are interested in engaging in work that improves the health and well-being of women, men, children, and families then you will enjoy this presentation – it may even give you ideas about how you can make a difference!

The stories help illustrate how MCH makes a difference in the lives of
women and children.


UIC Management Skills Series: March 2013-Feburary 2014

Program Description:
Management Skills Series is a professional development initiative designed to strengthen the participant’s basic and intermediate level management skills. The curriculum encompasses 12 topics offered on a monthly basis for three hours in person at the UIC School of Public Health.  Sessions can be taken on a stand-alone basis or as a certificate program.

Sessions will be offered in a workshop format and include an information-packed overview of the workshop topic as well as participatory learning activities such as case studies, role-playing, and group discussion. Participants will have the opportunity to build their knowledge base on management practices, policies and principles, sharpen comprehension of complex topics, and practice ways to apply new knowledge as a manager in a public health setting.

Workshops:

Foundations of Managing an Organization
03/15/2013    Introduction to Management Principles
04/19/2013    Vision, Mission, and Strategic Planning
05/17/2013    Building an Effective Board of Directors/Advisory Board

Increasing Your Management Effectiveness
06/21/2013    Understanding Communication Styles
07/19/2013    Building and Motivating Teams
08/16/2013    Conflict Resolution
09/20/2013    Overcoming Burnout

Managing Operations      
10/18/2013    Planning and Managing a Sustainable Budget
11/15/2013    Project Management
12/13/2013    Continuous Quality Improvement

Managing the 21st Century Organization  
01/17/2014    Increasing Impact through Collaboration and Partnerships
02/21/2014    Using Social Media for Marketing and Advocacy

** All the sessions are from 8:30 am – 12:00 pm**

Cost:
$450 for all 12
$50 for each session

Click here for session descriptions and to register (Note: There are three tabs at the top of the page to choose from, click on the tab to view the information you would like to see)

Scholarship Eligibility—MCHP Alumni:
Scholarships will cover the cost of all 12 sessions. We will be giving out 2 scholarships to MCH/MCHP EPI alumni. In order to qualify for the scholarships you must be an alumna of the Maternal and Child Health Program or the Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology Program.  Ideal candidates would have 2-4 years of work experience and be able to attend all 12 workshops.

Application Requirements:
Please submit your resume and a short statement describing your interest in the program.

Please address the following questions:
1) Why do you want to participate in this program?  2) What goal(s) are you hoping to achieve through this program?

Please email your resume and your statement to Jaime Klaus, MA, at jaimkl@uic.edu by February 18, 2013.  You will be notified if you received the scholarship by February 20, 2013.

Thank you for the interest in the program!

Please note: Continuing education units (CEU’s) are not available for this program Participants will receive a certificate of completion if they sign up for all 12 courses. However, he/she is absent for more than 3 workshops out of the 12 he/she will not receive the certificate.

 

 

Sponsored by:  MidAmerica Public Health Training Center, Great Cities Institute at UIC, and Maternal and Child Health Program.

 

 


Authentic Leadership: A Coach-Approach to Inspired Public Health Leadership (Should I Apply)?

Authentic Leadership may be for you if you say YES to any or all of the following:

  1. I work in some capacity to improve public health/maternal and child health.
  2. I want to forge my own path to leadership.
  3. I want a new role/responsibility/job/career in public health.
  4. I want to increase my level of satisfaction/engagement at work.
  5. I want to be in a program that invites me to co-design my learning and growth areas.
  6. I want to explore what makes me a leader.
  7. I want to self-identify as a leader.
  8. I want to feel alive, satisfied, and passion-filled about my professional and personal decisions.
  9. I want time and space to self-reflect.
  10. I appreciate (or want to appreciate) the value of self-awareness related to leadership.
  11. I have a leadership style that is different from everyone else’s style.
  12. Nobody understands me.
  13. I want to learn how to say yes to things that are most important to me and no to those things that are not currently a priority.
  14. I want someone else to help hold me accountable for what I say I want.
  15. I am tired of doing things in public health the same old way.
  16. I want to feel confident and secure in who I am.
  17. I want to focus on building my leadership strengths.
  18. I want a smooth transition into retirement.
  19. I want to shake things up in my life/work.
  20. I want to have greater impact in my work or life.
  21. I want more confidence.
  22. I want to feel the fire in my belly.
  23. I want to trust myself (more).
  24. I want my own certified professional coach.
  25. I want to have fun while I learn.
  26. I want to be in a program that doesn’t feel like more work added to my current, crazy workload.
  27. I am tired, burned out, overwhelmed.
  28. I am frustrated with the status quo.
  29. I can’t remember why I got into public health.
  30. I have a brilliant idea that I want to develop.
  31. I am innovative, passionate, creative and believe there are new ways to improve public health.
  1. I have been unsuccessfully looking outside myself for the answers to my questions.
  2. I want to create meaningful connections to others exploring leadership in the MCH field.

Authentic Leadership: A Coach-Approach to Inspired Public Health Leadership (Outcomes)

If you decide to enroll in Authentic Leadership, ou can expect to:

1)      Identify a set of authentic, individualized, values based personal/professional goals that support your leadership development and the impact you want to make in public health.

2)      Assess your current level of satisfaction with your personal and professional life.

3)      Improve your level of satisfaction in a minimum two life areas.

4)      Identify your leadership strengths and develop a plan to practice leading from strengths.

5)      Improve your emotionally intelligent leadership competencies related to the awareness and management of your emotions and those of others.

6)      Identify your personal and professional values through a values clarification process.

7)      Connect and develop lasting, creative, innovative, open relationships and community with diverse MCH colleagues from across the US.

8)      Develop a Leadership Philosophy and/or I Am A Leader Who…Statement/Youtube video that expresses your unique leadership philosophy.

9)      Create a Leadership Development Plan that you can sustain and that you feel personally accountable to over the 6-12 months following program conclusion.

10)  Identify yourself as an MCH leader regardless of your role and/position.

11)  Take on a new MCH role or position (if desired) or feel engaged and satisfied with your current work.

 

Above and beyond these outcomes, the experiences you take from this program will change you, or help you to become more of your true self, and you will remember and apply the learnings in new ways and for a long time.  Program participants who took our program as early as 2010 are still talking about how the program changed their lives.

 

 


Authentic Leadership: A Coach-Approach to Inspired Public Health Leadership

ABOUT THE PROGRAM

Authentic Leadership is a 6-month distance based program that takes place over the phone and through an online discussion board.   It builds emotional intelligence and develops authentic leadership capacity by focusing on strengths, values-based decision-making and goal-setting, authenticity, vulnerability, courage/risk-taking, and self-care/happiness as they relate to leadership.  What is unique, special, and strong about you?  How do we support you to develop and express your unique leadership style so that you can bring yourself and your passion into your work?  Using this framework, leadership is a very personal and life-long journey and may include aspects of any number of a wide range of leadership theories.

Authentic Leadership is a tried and true, sustainable leadership development program designed for maternal and child health and public health professionals at all stages of career and life development.  The program was first delivered by the UIC MCH Program in January 2010.  The program focuses on whole life leadership.  Depending on individual participant needs, each individual helps to design the program to create an ideal environment for personalized leadership development.  The program includes monthly full group calls; monthly, individual coaching sessions with a professional leadership coach; triad calls, and much more.   Group learning is applied at the individual level therefore participants may include a range of experience levels.  In the past, participants have included students, emerging leaders, mid- and senior-level professionals, and professionals transitioning into retirement.    Interested individuals complete a short application and submit a 1-2 page Letter of Interest.  The program begins twice yearly in January and July. 

 

PROGRAM LOGISTICS

Program Leaders

Kris Risley, DrPH, CPCC, kris@krisrisley.com, 312.996.2875

Hanna Cooper, MPH, CPCC, hncooper@earthlink.net

Teri, Conrad, MBA, CPCC, thewinnerwithin@comcast.net

Anne Kellogg Reed, CPCC, anne@bicyclelifecoaching.com

Application Deadline: Monday, November 12, 2012.  All materials including the Interest Form and answers to application questions should be mailed to the attention of Kris Risley, MCH Program, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1603 W. Taylor Street (MC 923), Chicago, IL 60612; faxed to: 312.996.3551, or emailed to kris@krisrisley.com.  If you have questions please contact Kris at kris@krisrisley.com or 312.996.2875.

Notification of Program Acceptance:  Wednesday, November 28, 2012

 

Program Start Date:  Friday, January 11, 2013

Program End DateFriday, June 28, 2013

 

Program Fee:  The program fee is $2400/person and is due to the MCH Program prior to the start of the program.  Checks can be made payable to the University of Illinois and mailed to Kris Risley, MCH Program, School of Public Health, 1603 W. Taylor Street, Chicago, IL 60612

 

Time Commitment:  On average, a person will spend between 3-7 hours/month working on this program.  However, this is not ‘work’ that is designed to add stress to an already overburdened workload.  The work of this program is different.  It is about you.  It is designed to support your work efforts so that you feel more leader-like, satisfied, engaged, content, hopeful, inspired, rejuvenated, alive, and certain of your ability to improve public health.


Registration Open – July 2012 MCH Leadership and Legacy Retreat

July 22-24, 2012

Hyatt Lodge, Oak Brook, IL

 Leading in Challenging Times: Innovations & Inspiration

Please consider joining us this summer for the 5th annual UIC MCH Leadership, Legacy, and Community Retreat.  This year’s retreat is exciting! Our focus is on Leading in Challenging Times; however, we will not talk about this concept in ways that you may expect. We will begin with sharing personal stories of our journey and work with women, men, children, and families. Dr. Michael Fraser, CEO of the Association for Maternal and Child Health Programs (AMCHP) will lead us in this process. We will continue to connect with one another through a building common ground exercise followed by a thought-provoking discussion about what motivates us!

During the rest of the Retreat, we will explore and practice various leadership concepts including challenging the assumption that these are indeed challenging times. Change is ubiquitous. Everything is always changing and today these changes are happening at an increasingly rapid pace across all aspects of our lives: the economy, the environment, technology, public health, medicine, music, leadership, etc. As we continue to move forward in ever-changing times, what do we know and do in this day and age to support ourselves, each other, the environment, the economy, and the work to which we have devoted our lives?

We will explore a process that will turn our thoughts about leadership upside down. This will be followed with work about managing change as change is a primary leadership challenge we all face. Finally, we will conclude the program with work on the core act of leadership which involves changing the typical conversations in which we engage so that we can ultimately experience the positive outcomes for women, men, children, and families that we all desire!

The leadership training will be facilitated by Dr. Stephen Bogdewic, PhD, Executive Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs & Professional Development at the Indiana University School of Medicine. Many of us have had the honor of working with, learning from, and being inspired by Dr. Bogdewic. He is an innovative, thought leader. He is connected with the human spirit and our core desires to make an impact. He has taken what he teaches and implemented it in practice to help change the face of the Indiana University School of Medicine.  Click on the following link to view the agenda.

*Please note the event starts on Sunday

 

Registration

Professionals: $325 (early registration ends on 07/06/2012) or $425 (late registration)

Students: $150

Click on the following link to register.

 

For more information visit our website.



Training Opportunity for Graduate Students Interested in Children with Developmental Disorders

2012/13 ILLINOIS LEND PROGRAM TRAINING ANNOUNCEMENT

An Opportunity for Future Leaders Serving Children with Developmental Disabilities

The Institute on Disability and Human Development at UIC is excited to announce LEND training opportunities open to graduate students from the core disciplines of:

  • Applied Behavior Analysis
  • Child Psychiatry
  • Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics
  • Disability Studies
  • Family
  • Nursing
  • Nutrition
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Pediatrics
  • Physical Therapy
  • Psychology
  • Public Health
  • Self-Advocate
  • Social Work
  • Special Education
  • Speech Language Pathology

The Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) program, sponsored by the Bureau of Maternal and Child Health, prepares future leaders who will serve children with neurodevelopmental and related disabilities (with a focus on autism) and their families.  The LEND Interdisciplinary Training Program is a one-year training program that incorporates both didactic and experiential learning in clinical and community-based settings. A stipend up to $5000 per year will be provided.  Trainees will gain experience in the coordination of culturally competent family-centered care, the provision of public health services, and the implementation of policy systems change.  The didactics take place over 2 semesters starting August 2012 and ending May 2013 with clinical/community training available through June 2013.

Deadline to apply is May 11, 2012.

Family/Self-Advocate trainees are individuals with a developmental disability and/or individuals who have a family member with a developmental disability. A high school diploma or equivalent is a requirement to be considered for the Family/Self-Advocate traineeship.  Priority is given to graduate students in the above disciplines and family/self-advocates; however, recent graduates working in the field may also apply.  In order to receive a stipend, a trainee must be a US citizen or permanent resident.

For more information about the LEND program or to complete an application, please visit the IL LEND website or contact the LEND Project Coordinator:

Leslie Stiles

vlazny@uic.edu

312-996-8905

Leslie Stiles, MS, RD, LDN

IL LEND Project Coordinator

University of Illinois at Chicago

1640 W. Roosevelt Rd. #205A

Chicago, IL 60608

312.996.8905