Category: Leadership Development

Alumna Success Story–Jessica Bushar Providing Access to Crucial Health Information for Mothers

Jessica_Bushar_picture

Jessica Bushar, MPH
Research Director Text4baby
National Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Coalition

Jessica Bushar earned a Master of Public Health in Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology at UIC in 2010 and was a recipient of an award from Irving Harris Foundation. Following her graduation from UIC, Jessica was a Principal Research Analyst at NORC at the University of Chicago. In 2012, she began working at the National Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Coalition (HMHB) where she now holds the position of Research Director of Text4baby.

Jessica is passionate about her work on Text4baby, which partners with more than 1,200 local, state, and national partners to improve the health of mothers and babies by providing timely, vital health and safety information to mothers by via text message. The Text4baby program has reached over 800,000 pregnant women and new moms and provided them with over 116 million text messages. As the Research Director, Jessica spends much of her time at HMHB working with partners and staff to evaluate Text4baby’s impact and facilitate research informed quality improvement.

Jessica believes her degree in Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology from UIC helped improve her qualitative research skills and gain the competencies needed to make her a well-rounded researcher – skills that have made it possible for her to excel at her position as Research Director of Text4baby. Jessica’s research is implemented in real time to make a widespread positive impact on the lives of moms and babies through easy to access, crucial health information.

Written by Cristina Turino, UIC Research Assistant and UIC MCH MPH Candidate


Alumna Success Story–Madiha Qureshi Improving Health Outcomes for Mothers & Infants

Madiha Qureshi, MPH
State Director of Program Services
March of Dimes

Madiha Qureshi is the State Director of Program Services at the March of Dimes. As State Director, Madiha oversees the Illinois chapter’s programming and grant making to support state-wide efforts to reduce premature birth, infant mortality, and help mothers have full term pregnancies. She is currently working with maternal and child health leaders, health providers, and stakeholders across Illinois on initiatives to lower early elective deliveries before 39 weeks gestation. The campaign empowers and educates consumers about the importance of letting labor begin on its own and works with hospitals to develop “hard stop policies” and procedures to prevent early elective deliveries. Additionally, under Madiha’s leadership, the Illinois Chapter of March of Dimes is working on increasing bilingual prenatal education programs for expecting mothers and male involvement programming.

Madiha graduated from UIC with a Master of Public Health from the Maternal and Child Health Program (MCHP) in 2009, and she was a recipient of an Irving Harris Foundation Award. Madiha chose to attend the UIC School of Public Health because of her passion for advocating for women and infants, and the strong Maternal and Child Health Program. One of her most formative experiences while at UIC was attending Leadership, Legacy, & Community: A Retreat to Advance MCH Scholarship & Practice Leadership, which was hosted by MCHP through support from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau. The Retreat brought together “amazing leaders from the field” who were truly excited about the work they were doing. This experience solidified Madiha’s commitment to the MCH discipline and helped her form connections with public health leaders in Chicago.

Madiha is making significant contributions to the MCH community through her leadership at the March of Dimes to improve health outcomes for mothers and infants.

Written by Cristina Turino, UIC Research Assistant and UIC MCH MPH Candidate


Practicum Experience 2014: Chicago Department of Public Health

IMG_7584 (4)So far, our time at the Women and Children’s Health Division at the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) has been very translational to what we learned in our first year at the University of Illinois at Chicago, School of Public Health (UIC SPH).  We are conducting a Community Health Needs Assessment for the MCH population in Chicago under the guidance of CDPH Assistant Commissioner, Susan Hossli. To start, we gathered quantitative data in the form of vital statistics; this included infant mortality rates, low birth weight percentages, preterm deliveries, and teenage pregnancy rates for Chicago and the 77 community areas. We used the data to identify 18 community areas that have the poorest outcomes and we designated them as “Hot Spots.” These community areas are located on both the South and West Sides of Chicago.

After we compiled quantitative data for Chicago and the Hot Spots, we created a demographic picture of each neighborhood, which included socioeconomic status, overall health, education attainment, insurance, income, housing, poverty, crime, food access, and educational resources. These topics touched on what we learned in the Determinants of Population Health class, a new introductory class in the pilot core (IPHS 494). We learned that health is not only affected by biological factors, but also where you live, learn, play, work, pray, and age. It is also pivotal to understand that factors affecting health run the entire life course, as well as transcend generations.

Following the quantitative data, we prepared a systems analysis for each community area. The systems assessment analyzes the available resources in one’s neighborhood; this includes, but is not limited to Healthy Start programs, FQHCs, Healthy Families, Better Birth Outcomes, family case management, hospitals, clinics, birthing hospitals, WIC, family planning, behavioral health programs, and dental programs. This process was very informative because we gained a holistic view of the healthcare environment in the Hot Spot community areas.

We took Community Health Assessment (CHSC 431) in Spring 2014, and it was the perfect primer for this practicum. The knowledge, skills and tools we gained in that class proved essential for our success in this practicum. In CHSC 431, we learned the basics of a community health assessment: what it is, how the process works, where to find the appropriate and credible data, how to identify priority issues, how to obtain and analyze qualitative data, and then how to disseminate the information to community groups and key stakeholders. Another useful class prior to this practicum was MCH Delivery Systems: Services, Programs, and Policies (CHSC 511). In this course, we were introduced to the concept of what a health care delivery system is. We learned about the service delivery system for women, infants, children, and children with special health care needs. Our cumulative project over the semester was to synthesize and analyze the MCH delivery system for various states.

For a holistic view on the health status of Women and Children in Chicago, it is necessary to have a mixed-methods approach for data acquisition. Quantitative data is important to provide a snapshot of the health status, but qualitative data provides a full narrative of the gaps in access to a healthy life. We are currently scheduling focus groups on the West and South Sides of Chicago with consumers, service providers, and community based organizations. The focus groups will complete the needs assessment, and then a Strategic Plan for the City of Chicago will be formulated based on the data and gaps in services found in the needs assessment.

This practicum has been a learning opportunity since we have seen our coursework play out in a practical setting. It is exciting to see our work with the needs assessment play such a large role for the Department of Public Health. This project was undertaken with the hopes of influencing future programming and decision making within the city for healthy mothers and babies.

By Joanna Tess and Dan Weiss, UIC MCHP Students

 


Save the Children Event at UIC: Uniting for Maternal and Child Health

The University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), Maternal and Child Health Program (MCHP) partnered with Save the Children, UIC’s Global Health Initiative, The University of Chicago’s Global Health Initiative, and Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine’s Center for Global Health to host a seminar at UIC on October 14th.  This was part of a three part lecture series where each university hosted an event that addressed various topics related to maternal and child health.

The keynote speaker was Steven Wall, MD, MPH, MSW, Senior Advisor, Save the Children, who discussed a report that was recently released by Save the Children entitled, “Surviving the First Day: State of the World’s Mothers 2013”.

Then the seminar focused on connecting the global to the local, and there were brief presentations by the following stakeholders:

  • Brenda Jones, DHSc, MSN, APN-BC, Deputy Director, Office of Women’s Health, Illinois Department of Public Health
  • Janine Lewis, MPH, Executive Director, EverThrive Illinois
  • Rosemary White Traut, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor, Department of Women, Children and Family Health Science, UIC College of Nursing

The MCHP would like thank all our partners for such a great event!  It was a pleasure working with all of you and we look forward to working with you in the future!

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“We are MCH”: Presentations about Maternal and Child Health

 Learn about the MCH field, our legacy, and the positive impact we have had on the health and well being of women, children and families.

 

The University of South Florida coordinated efforts with the Maternal and Child Health Training Programs to create Prezi presentations entitled “We Are MCH”.  Several MCH training programs (including our program) submitted pictures and quotes that were included in these presentations. The hope is to raise awareness about the field of MCH and the great work that is being done.

 

Click on the following links to view the presentations:
http://prezi.com/rz0qkn_wwzvp/we-are-mch/
http://prezi.com/c7e6u6hpyk2u/we-are-mch-mini-1/
http://prezi.com/wc9jvevjv3nz/we-are-mch-mini-2/
http://prezi.com/kyjdfgl9b17o/we-are-mch-mini-3/

 

 


Want to Know More About MCH?

The students in the University of Washington Maternal and Child Health
(MCH) Program and in other MCH schools of public health training
programs nationwide created a visual narrative of the public health work
and research they are doing in their communities. The presentation was done with the help of Charlotte Noble and the University of South Florida MCH Program.

You can view the presentation here.  If you are interested in engaging in work that improves the health and well-being of women, men, children, and families then you will enjoy this presentation – it may even give you ideas about how you can make a difference!

The stories help illustrate how MCH makes a difference in the lives of
women and children.


UIC Management Skills Series: March 2013-Feburary 2014

Program Description:
Management Skills Series is a professional development initiative designed to strengthen the participant’s basic and intermediate level management skills. The curriculum encompasses 12 topics offered on a monthly basis for three hours in person at the UIC School of Public Health.  Sessions can be taken on a stand-alone basis or as a certificate program.

Sessions will be offered in a workshop format and include an information-packed overview of the workshop topic as well as participatory learning activities such as case studies, role-playing, and group discussion. Participants will have the opportunity to build their knowledge base on management practices, policies and principles, sharpen comprehension of complex topics, and practice ways to apply new knowledge as a manager in a public health setting.

Workshops:

Foundations of Managing an Organization
03/15/2013    Introduction to Management Principles
04/19/2013    Vision, Mission, and Strategic Planning
05/17/2013    Building an Effective Board of Directors/Advisory Board

Increasing Your Management Effectiveness
06/21/2013    Understanding Communication Styles
07/19/2013    Building and Motivating Teams
08/16/2013    Conflict Resolution
09/20/2013    Overcoming Burnout

Managing Operations      
10/18/2013    Planning and Managing a Sustainable Budget
11/15/2013    Project Management
12/13/2013    Continuous Quality Improvement

Managing the 21st Century Organization  
01/17/2014    Increasing Impact through Collaboration and Partnerships
02/21/2014    Using Social Media for Marketing and Advocacy

** All the sessions are from 8:30 am – 12:00 pm**

Cost:
$450 for all 12
$50 for each session

Click here for session descriptions and to register (Note: There are three tabs at the top of the page to choose from, click on the tab to view the information you would like to see)

Scholarship Eligibility—MCHP Alumni:
Scholarships will cover the cost of all 12 sessions. We will be giving out 2 scholarships to MCH/MCHP EPI alumni. In order to qualify for the scholarships you must be an alumna of the Maternal and Child Health Program or the Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology Program.  Ideal candidates would have 2-4 years of work experience and be able to attend all 12 workshops.

Application Requirements:
Please submit your resume and a short statement describing your interest in the program.

Please address the following questions:
1) Why do you want to participate in this program?  2) What goal(s) are you hoping to achieve through this program?

Please email your resume and your statement to Jaime Klaus, MA, at jaimkl@uic.edu by February 18, 2013.  You will be notified if you received the scholarship by February 20, 2013.

Thank you for the interest in the program!

Please note: Continuing education units (CEU’s) are not available for this program Participants will receive a certificate of completion if they sign up for all 12 courses. However, he/she is absent for more than 3 workshops out of the 12 he/she will not receive the certificate.

 

 

Sponsored by:  MidAmerica Public Health Training Center, Great Cities Institute at UIC, and Maternal and Child Health Program.

 

 


UIC MCHP Degree Programs: Deadline to Apply is Approaching

Our program:

Through leadership, scholarship, and partnership, the Maternal and Child Health program (MCHP) at the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health trains students to support and promote the health and well-being of women, children, and families.  The program emphasizes multi-level approaches to understanding the complex factors that affect population health and health disparities.  An essential ingredient is the partnerships we have with public and private agencies serving the MCH population and the communities in which MCH problems are most persistent and pervasive.  The program is committed to scientific rigor, evidence-based public health practice, and the principles of participatory and collaborative research and practice.  The program offers a special track in MCH Epidemiology with an emphasis on training individuals to carry out high-level epidemiologic work focusing on the activities of the MCH planning cycle (i.e. surveillance, assessment, planning, implementation, monitoring, evaluation, and policy development).

 

Degrees Offered:

Master of Public Health (MPH) in MCH and MCH Epidemiology

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in MCH and MCH Epidemiology

 

Eligibility:

MCH applicants must be accepted into the MPH or PhD program in  the Division of Community Health Sciences at the UIC-SPH and have an interest in the area of MCH.

MCH Epidemiology applicants must be accepted into the MPH or PhD program in either the Division of Community Health Sciences or the Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the UIC-SPH and have an interest in the area of MCH Epidemiology.

Applications are due on February 1, 2013 for domestic students and December 15, 2012 for international students.

To learn more about the UIC MCH Program and how to apply, please contact Jaime Klaus at jaimkl@uic.edu or visit our website at www.uic.edu/sph/mch.

 


Authentic Leadership: A Coach-Approach to Inspired Public Health Leadership (Should I Apply)?

Authentic Leadership may be for you if you say YES to any or all of the following:

  1. I work in some capacity to improve public health/maternal and child health.
  2. I want to forge my own path to leadership.
  3. I want a new role/responsibility/job/career in public health.
  4. I want to increase my level of satisfaction/engagement at work.
  5. I want to be in a program that invites me to co-design my learning and growth areas.
  6. I want to explore what makes me a leader.
  7. I want to self-identify as a leader.
  8. I want to feel alive, satisfied, and passion-filled about my professional and personal decisions.
  9. I want time and space to self-reflect.
  10. I appreciate (or want to appreciate) the value of self-awareness related to leadership.
  11. I have a leadership style that is different from everyone else’s style.
  12. Nobody understands me.
  13. I want to learn how to say yes to things that are most important to me and no to those things that are not currently a priority.
  14. I want someone else to help hold me accountable for what I say I want.
  15. I am tired of doing things in public health the same old way.
  16. I want to feel confident and secure in who I am.
  17. I want to focus on building my leadership strengths.
  18. I want a smooth transition into retirement.
  19. I want to shake things up in my life/work.
  20. I want to have greater impact in my work or life.
  21. I want more confidence.
  22. I want to feel the fire in my belly.
  23. I want to trust myself (more).
  24. I want my own certified professional coach.
  25. I want to have fun while I learn.
  26. I want to be in a program that doesn’t feel like more work added to my current, crazy workload.
  27. I am tired, burned out, overwhelmed.
  28. I am frustrated with the status quo.
  29. I can’t remember why I got into public health.
  30. I have a brilliant idea that I want to develop.
  31. I am innovative, passionate, creative and believe there are new ways to improve public health.
  1. I have been unsuccessfully looking outside myself for the answers to my questions.
  2. I want to create meaningful connections to others exploring leadership in the MCH field.

Authentic Leadership: A Coach-Approach to Inspired Public Health Leadership (Outcomes)

If you decide to enroll in Authentic Leadership, ou can expect to:

1)      Identify a set of authentic, individualized, values based personal/professional goals that support your leadership development and the impact you want to make in public health.

2)      Assess your current level of satisfaction with your personal and professional life.

3)      Improve your level of satisfaction in a minimum two life areas.

4)      Identify your leadership strengths and develop a plan to practice leading from strengths.

5)      Improve your emotionally intelligent leadership competencies related to the awareness and management of your emotions and those of others.

6)      Identify your personal and professional values through a values clarification process.

7)      Connect and develop lasting, creative, innovative, open relationships and community with diverse MCH colleagues from across the US.

8)      Develop a Leadership Philosophy and/or I Am A Leader Who…Statement/Youtube video that expresses your unique leadership philosophy.

9)      Create a Leadership Development Plan that you can sustain and that you feel personally accountable to over the 6-12 months following program conclusion.

10)  Identify yourself as an MCH leader regardless of your role and/position.

11)  Take on a new MCH role or position (if desired) or feel engaged and satisfied with your current work.

 

Above and beyond these outcomes, the experiences you take from this program will change you, or help you to become more of your true self, and you will remember and apply the learnings in new ways and for a long time.  Program participants who took our program as early as 2010 are still talking about how the program changed their lives.