Category: MCH Leadership Competencies 3.0: Self: Ethics and Professionalism

MCH Faculty Serve As Editors of New Textbook

Congratulations to all the MCHP faculty members, alumni and students who worked on the recently published textbook “Reducing Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Reproductive and Perinatal Outcomes: The Evidence from Population-Based Interventions”!

Despite the development of numerous programs, initiatives, and approaches to address the delivery of care during the preconceptional, prenatal, and postpartum periods, the major indicators of maternal and infant morbidity and mortality in the US have not uniformly shown marked improvement over the last two decades; most notably, racial/ethnic disparities in key maternal and infant health status measures have remained persistent, and in some cases, even increased.  The focus of this book is to review the evidence base for public health interventions aimed at improving reproductive and perinatal outcomes and the potential of these interventions to reduce disparities in such outcomes between racial/ethnic groups in the United States.

For more information click here.

MCHP faculty, alumni and students who contributed to this book:
MCHP Faculty: Dr. Arden Handler (editor), Dr. Joan Kennelly (editor), Dr. Nadine Peacock (editor), Dr. Noel Chavez, and Dr. Michele Issel

MCHP Alumni:  Beth Pelletteri, MPH,  Anna Wiencrot, MPH,  Jaime Slaughter, PhD, Sarah G. Forrestal, PhD, Patricia Garcia, MPH and Suzanne Carlberg-Racich

MCHP Students: Ashley Dyer and Amanda Bennett, MPH


Proposed Title V Cuts!

Hi all.  We wanted to share this information regarding proposed Title V cuts with you in case you have not heard.  Towards the end of the message, you will see possible action steps you can take.

Today House Appropriations Committee Chairman Harold Rogers (R-KY) released initial details of a House proposal

(http://appropriations.house.gov/index.cfm?FuseAction=PressReleases.Detail&PressRelease_id=259&Month=2&Year=2011))

to revise the current continuing resolution (CR) that would fund federal government through the rest of the fiscal year.  The proposal includes a $210 million cut to the Title V Maternal & Child Health Block Grant and is expected to be voted on in the House early next week.  It is absolutely imperative that your Members of Congress hear from you today about how devastating this cut would be to the maternal and child health and children with special health care needs programs in your state.

AMCHP urges all members and friends to call your elected officials NOW with the following message:

• I am calling in strong opposition to the proposed $210 million cut to the Title V MCH Block Grant included in the revised House continuing resolution.

$210 million is a 32% cut to an effective, important, and vital program in our state.

•Cuts this deep will devastate state and local programs serving women, babies, children, and children with special health care needs in our state.

•This cut is counter-productive because health issues that we don’t prevent or detect early through this program now will ultimately cost us all more later.  For example, the average cost of a premature baby is $58,000 – it makes no sense to cut programs that work to prevent maternal and child health issues like prematurity that will save us money in the future.

•Please tell (Your Representative’s/Senator’s name) that we should not balance the budget on the backs of babies and our nation’s most vulnerable.

Members of Congress need to hear from you today. They listen to onstituents and it is imperative they know how these cuts will impact mothers and children in their jurisdictions.  Therefore, in accordance with your organization’s advocacy rules, AMCHP urges you to contact your elected officials now.  AMCHP also asks that you share this email with all MCH advocates in your state and urge them to also contact their Members of Congress.

Your efforts to reach Members of Congress will be critical to preventing deep cuts to MCH programs in FY 2011. Please share any feedback you receive with AMCHP staff about your contacts as this will be helpful as we continue our advocacy efforts  on your behalf.   For more information or to share feedback please contact Joshua Brown (jrbown@amchp.org) or Brent Ewig (bewig@amchp.org) via email or at (202) 775-0436.

Need helping finding your Representative’s or Senator’s Phone Number?

To find your senators’ and representatives’ phone numbers, use this searchable online congressional directory or call the U.S. Capitol Switchboard at (202) 224-3121 and ask for your senators’ and/or representative’s office.  Ask to speak with the aide who handles health

issues and leave a voice mail if you cannot reach them directly.   While the urgency of the situation requires immediate phone calls, you may want to follow-up with an email or fax to reiterate your point.  You can find email addresses and fax numbers at www.house.gov and www.senate.gov.   First priority is to contact members of the House of Representatives as they will vote first, and we also urge you to call your state’s two Senators to share your views with them as well.


MCH Trainee and Alumni Webinar

Hi All.  We wanted to share the archive of a recent MCH Webinar with you.  If you are a current student in an MCH training program, such as the MCH Program at the UIC School of Public Health or any of the diverse MCH training programs across the country, an alumni of one of these programs, thinking about enrolling in a graduate program in MCH, or thinking about a career involved in improving the health and well-being of women, children, and families please take a listen to this webinar.  It helps to create a context for the work we do in MCH and is quite inspiring!

The Webinar provides an overview of HHS/HRSA/MCHB/ DRTE and the Training Program Portfolio.  You will learn how MCH leadership training serves as the catalyst to assure national MCH impact and MCHB Training Program priorities.  The slides and the audio are available here.

The speaker is Gwendolyn J. Adam, PhD, LMSW

Chief, Training Branch

Division of Research, Training and Education

Maternal and Child Health Bureau

Health Resources and Services Administration


Professional Coaching: An Innovative and Promising Leadership Development Approach for MCH Professionals

By Kris Risley, DrPH, CPCC
Continuing Education Director, Maternal and Child Health Program, Division of Community Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago

Hanna Cooper, MPH, CPCC, PCC
Public Health Consultant and Leadership Coach

Professional coaching, a process to maximize personal and professional development, is a relatively new but cost-effective and increasingly accessible leadership development approach available for maternal and child health (MCH) professionals. By incorporating coaching into the menu of professional development options available to MCH practitioners and scholars, we extend the breadth of professional training to include the personal aspects of leadership development that involves the life-long exploration and expansion of emotional intelligence (EI) which contributes to upwards of 80 percent of the success that distinguishes outstanding from average leaders (Goleman et al, 2002).

MCH leaders express knowledge and skills across a range of 72 MCH leadership competencies in 12 domains and three circles of influence including self, others, and wider-community (MCH Leadership Competencies 3.0) with the ultimate goal being that we actively engage in work that results in the significant improvement of the health and well-being of women, children and families. Professional coaching and coaching programs facilitate the development of MCH leadership competencies in the domains of Self-Reflection, Ethics and Professionalism, Critical Thinking, Communication, Developing Others Through Teaching and Mentoring, and Working with Communities and Systems.

Coaching builds EI by helping individuals to become increasingly self-aware and able to manage their emotions as well as increasingly socially aware and able to manage their relationships with others (Goleman et al, 2002). Individuals high in EI competencies are adept at self-reflection and assessing how their feelings affect them and their job performance, they rely on their internal value system to guide decision-making, and tend to be authentic and transparent in their interactions with others compared with those who have lower EI. Emotionally intelligent people are aware of their strengths and limitations, use empathy to relate to a wide range of people from diverse backgrounds and perspectives, and they inspire others to move passionately toward a shared vision. Emotional intelligence may be the key factor to support MCH professionals as they navigate the high degree of change, challenge, stress and burnout present in the field.

There are many coaching programs and approaches available in the market-place. The best programs integrate adult learning approaches such as Transformational Learning Theory (TLT) (Mezirow et al, 2009) and they enhance EI. In TLT, learning is defined as transformation associated with challenging individuals to assess how their experiences interact with their existing value system and worldview. This compares with an informational learning in which new information is transferred from an expert to a student. For example, MCH scholars teach graduate students about the social determinants of health. Both are important and they serve different purposes.

Although there are many different schools of thought about coaching, professionally trained coaches provide an ongoing partnership designed to help clients improve their performance and enhance the quality of their lives. Coaches are trained to listen, to observe and to customize their approach to individual client needs. They seek to elicit solutions and strategies from the client; they believe the client is naturally creative and resourceful. The coach’s job is to provide support to enhance the skills, resources, and creativity that already exists within the client. Coaching enables individuals to translate personal learning and insight into improved effectiveness; it increases linkages among self-development, leadership development and organizational effectiveness (International Coaching Federation, 2010).

Coaching can be applied in a variety of ways including:
• Developing leadership development and coaching programs for MCH professionals (contact Kris Risley at UIC for an example of how this is currently being implemented).
• Adding coaching to existing leadership and career development programs such as those in Schools of Public Health
• Offering coaching as an alumni or association member benefit
• Providing in-service coach training to integrate coaching as a method of engaging with students and colleagues

Whatever the method, coaching can be used as a leadership development method to support our field in achieving the Healthy People 2020 objectives for Women, Children and Families by helping individuals identify and fully express themselves and their unique passion and commitment to women, children and families.

References
Goleman, D., Boyatzis, R, & McKee, A. (2002). Primal Leadership: Learning to Lead with Emotional Intelligence. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

International Coaching Federation, http://www.coachfederation.org/find-a-coach/what-is-coaching/, retrieved December 1, 2010.

MCH Leadership Competencies Workgroup (Editors). (2009).Maternal and Child Health Leadership Competencies: Version 3.0.

Mezirow, J, Taylor, Edward W, and Associates. (2009). Transformative Learning in Practice: Insights from Community, Workplace, and Higher Education. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

This article was featured in the January issue of PULSE: A Monthly Newsletter from the Association Of Maternal and Child Health Programs http://www.amchp.org/AboutAMCHP/Newsletters/Pulse/January2011/Pages/Feature3.aspx.

Individual Professional Coaching
Individual sessions are available to AMCHP conference attendees at no cost. Conference attendees will have an opportunity to take advantage of individual, private 40-minute coaching sessions Sunday through Tuesday, February 13-15, by registering in advance or by registering on site. Space is limited and available on a first-come, first-serve basis. To find out more about coaching at the 2011 AMCHP Annual Conference or registering for an individual session, please contact Librada Estrada or call (202) 266-3046.


MCHB Life Course Resources

For additional information and resources related to Life Course, please visit the Maternal and Child Health Bureau’s website.